fryday: chinese omelet

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Chinese Omelet | fortune goodies
Eggs. They’re the best aren’t they? That’s no hyperbole. I type this after just consuming a big, fat Trader Joe’s breakfast burrito – at 12:51a.m. Ugh. I’m the worst. I had a late lunch and skipped dinner, but still. 

Back to the bestness of eggs. I could never go vegan, not when cake and breakfast are my favorite foods. So as I pray that an egg-less life is never something I have to know, I thought I’d show my mom some love ahead of all-important Mothers’ day by sharing her recipe for Chinese omelets.

Unlike its heavily-loaded western counterpart (“western” as in Asia is East and everything else is West, not “western” as in a ham and pepper Denver omelet, but I suppose that works in this context too) the Chinese omelet is a simple egg-and-green-onion thing generally served as a breakfast dish to share. We Chinese are big on family-style and the same applies to breakfast. It’s a beautiful thing, so please get working and dig in!

Eggs and Green Onions for Chinese Omelet
To make a Chinese-style omelet, you’ll need: eggs, green onions, salt, ground white pepper, chicken bouillon powder, and it wouldn’t be Fryday without some oil for frying. 

Notice how I didn’t say cheese? Cheese in omelets I’m also crazy for, but the Chinese still haven’t figured out how to make it. You can find it in China’s many, many McDonald’s, but that’s about it. Isn’t that so sad? That and the pollution are the reasons why I could never live there. So anyway, no cheese here, but even without this stuff is delicious. 

Chinese Omelet prep
“You’ve got to crack a few eggs to make an omelet.”

^ The best thing ever said at a high school Model United Nations meeting. 

To start: Crack the eggs and dice up the green onion. 

Chinese Omelet Ingredients Prep
Combine eggs, green onions and seasonings in a bowl. 

Scrambling Eggs for Chinese Omelet
Then scramble everything together. Use chopsticks if you’re feeling authentic.

Hot pan
Now comes the frying.

Put a big skillet over a big flame and get the pan nice and hot. As mom always says, “Eggs like heat.” That’s a lesson we learned with this recipe

Once the pan is hot, add a couple of tablespoons to a ¼ cup oil to the pan. Eggs like oil too. 

Chineses Omelet making
Once the oil starts sizzling, you’ll know it’s time for the eggs.

Chances are you’ve made an omelet before. If that’s the case, let me spare you the step-by-step instructions and say that this isn’t the kind of omelet that needs to be folded in half. Go ahead and cook and flip it all as one big flat piece more conducive to sharing. 

For those of you less familiar with the subtle nuances of omelet making, keep reading. 

Pour the Chinese omelet mixture into the pan, but don’t stir anything just yet. Let the eggs cook for about a minute or so to let the bottom set. 

With a heat-resistant spatula, gently push edges of the egg into the center of the pan, while tilting the pan to allow the liquid parts of the omelet to get their cooking on.

Chinese Omelet in the making
When you can easily slide the omelet around is when you know the bottom is set and ready for flipping.

Gently flip the omelet over, using your spatula to help you if necessary. I have yet to master the pan flip, so the spatula is a necessity.

Cook for a little while longer until the omelet can once again slide around the bottom of the pan.

Chinese Omelet
Transfer the omelet to a plate and serve with whatever you’d like, but in the Yang household we like it with rice porridge and a Chinese Cucumber Salad. Enjoy!

Have a great weekend! Don’t forget to call your mom and tell her you love her. TGIFryday. 

chinese omelet
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Ingredients
  1. 6 eggs
  2. 3 green onions
  3. 1 teaspoon salt
  4. ⅛ teaspoon white pepper
  5. ¼ teaspoon chicken bouillon powder
  6. oil for frying
Instructions
  1. Crack eggs and dice up green onions.
  2. Combine and scramble eggs, green onions, salt and other flavorings.
  3. Put a big skillet over a big flame and get the pan nice and hot.
  4. Once hot, add a couple of tablespoons to a ¼ cup oil to the pan.
  5. When the oil starts sizzling, you’ll know it’s time for the eggs.
  6. For those of you less familiar with the subtle nuances of omelet making, keep reading.
  7. Pour the Chinese omelet mixture into the pan, but don’t stir anything just yet. Let the eggs cook for about a minute or so to let the bottom set.
  8. With a heat-resistant spatula, gently push edges of the egg into the center of the pan, while tilting the pan to allow the liquid parts of the omelet to get their cooking on.
  9. When you can easily slide the omelet around is when you know the bottom is set and ready for flipping.
  10. Gently flip the omelet over, using your spatula to help you if necessary.
  11. Cook for a little while longer until the omelet can once again slide around the bottom of the pan.
  12. Transfer the omelet to a plate and enjoy!
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4 Responses to fryday: chinese omelet

  1. Ah, the omelet! I still can’t do a pan flip, but this really delightful. I wonder if, as a variation, it could also be baked in the oven?

    • Yang says:

      I wonder. I know that this omelet relies heavily on oil, so I’m not sure how the baking would work. If we’re going to bake eggs, we might as well go all out and bake a quiche instead. Love me some quiche.

  2. Erin says:

    Omelet. Rice porridge. Cucumber salad. MMMMMM. Can the Yangs adopt me?

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